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Conservation & Politics News Poaching Texas

Game Warden Stories: Illegal Red Snapper, Stripers, Whitetail Buck

September 21st, 2017 0

Officers face a myriad of incidents when in the field — these game warden stories range from the serious to the ridiculous.

Regularly, the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department posts “Game Warden Notes,” an online roundup of recent law enforcement stories compiled directly from reports in the field.

Three stories about kayakers in need of help were included in this most recent roundup (republished with permission).

game warden stories

(Graphic from Texas Parks & Wildlife)

From the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Game Warden Field Notes Sept. 14

The Buck Stops Here

A Goliad County game warden received a call from a landowner claiming to have found a dead white-tailed buck on his property that appeared to have been shot.

After talking to the landowner and inspecting the deer, the warden concluded it had indeed been shot. The farmer told the warden he had stopped a vehicle near his property late the night before and got the driver’s name.

An investigation into the shooting resulted in multiple cases filed against four individuals. Civil restitution charges were filed for a white-tailed buck deer scoring 125 1/8 Boone & Crockett.

Holy Snap!

In mid-August, game wardens participated in a joint patrol operation in the Gulf of Mexico targeting fishing violations for reef fish and highly migratory species.

While on patrol, wardens observed a recreational fishing vessel fishing near gulf shrimp boats and made contact with the 10 people on board.

During the inspection, it was found that there were 40 red snapper on board. Each person was over their federal limit of two red snapper per person.

Cases were filed and referred for federal violations and federal restitution on 20 red snapper over the limit on board the vessel.

Caught and Released

A Williamson County game warden was patrolling the Overlook Park on Lake Georgetown following several complaints that people were taking undersized striped bass.

The warden found one individual who didn’t have a valid fishing license and was in possession of three striped bass measuring 17, 18, and 19 inches.

The warden confiscated the fish and was able to release two of them back into the water alive. The other striped bass was donated to a needy family.

The fisherman was issued citations for not having a fishing license and possession of undersized striped bass. Civil restitution is pending.

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