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Fishing Florida Saltwater

Monster Mako: Florida Bankers Land 1000-Pound Mako Shark

by Game & Fish Staff   |  June 28th, 2011 70

The 12-foot, 1,006 pound mako took up a large part of the deck!

There were no bail outs needed for seven Florida bankers who landed a whopper of a fish — a 12-foot-long, 1,006-pound mako shark — while participating in a Florida International University alumni event 16 miles off of Elliot Key, which is just south of Miami and a part of Biscayne National Park.

The group thought they were in store for a casual fishing competition for mahi mahi, the kind of event a white-collared banker might partake in that involves cold drinks, sun burns, and a morning after hangover. The day unfolded much differently however and left each of them with an epic fish tale that would make Captain Ahab sit up and pay attention.

While aboard the fishing yacht Wound Up, boat Captain John Dudas and crew noticed the unmistakable dorsal fin of a mako shark trailing the boat at a distance and they quickly hatched a plan to try and land the massive fish.

A giant slab of bonita was hooked and cast out by mate Robbie Ramirez, while Dudas swung the boat around. The 1000-pound mako shark took the bait and a reel holding 50-pound test line with a 2,000-pound leader was immediately put to the test.

Once hooked, five of the seven anglers took turns reeling in the massive predator over a four-hour period. Warren Sands, who owns Wound Up, took over the last 30 minutes and eventually was able to get the shark gaffed and drug through the transom door with the help of several others.

The 1,006 pound shark is the biggest shark a Dudas captained boat has ever landed by 94 pounds. The world all-tackle record according to the International Game Fish Association is 1,221 pounds, which was caught in Chatham, Massachusetts in 2001.

This wasn’t a catch and release affair. The giant beast was butchered and processed for its meat while the jaw was rushed to a local taxidermist for a trophy mount.

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