Task No. 22 - Extreme Angling ? Canoe v/s Kayak Bass Fishing!


  Extreme Kayak Fishing has become a very popular sport in recent years, and it is one of my favorite ways to fish solo. However when fishing with my wife, and taking gear for a day on the water for two, Canoe Fishing for us has became just as extreme, because we can enjoy the thrill of catching trophy bass together in places that boats cannot go. Join me as I look back to what developed my current style of Extreme Angling.       

 As a young man it wasn?t extreme angling that captured my love of the water. It was kayaking the Ocoee and Hiwassee rivers in East Tennessee.  ?River Rat? I was called for my obsession with the rush and adrenaline of white water rapids. As a Boy Scout, I earned much more than my Eagle Scout Rank in 1983, I also earned my first solo kayak adventure through Devils Shoals. 

 Back in those days extreme sports did not include fishing. That was what we did when we returned to camp. As you can see the fishing merit badge was one that I earned as a kid. Top water bass fishing also has a rush of adrenaline that equals that of going over rapids.         

 The two sports of kayaking and fishing recently collided and has rapidly become the new way to experience the joy of fishing. But fishing from a canoe has been productive for me and I truly enjoy it more and more as I fish from our canoe. I am not knocking the modern angling kayaks, they are amazing, and they continue to improve as manufactures realize the popularity of the fairly new sport. Perhaps someday we can own a pair but for now we are content with the Guide 147 Canoe we have.  
In this video Donna catches her first large trophy bass from a canoe after we first got it.    


  There are extreme advantages to fishing from small boats such as a low profile, a quite stealthy approach and launching in waters not accessible to bass boats. My wife and I realize the advantages of canoes over kayaks include the storage of our fishing gear and being get to it easily is a plus. Working together as a team we can quickly net large fish.

 Gear storage as well as a Fishfinder is no problem. In a canoe there is plenty of room for our tackle boxes, several rods and a cooler with plenty of room for us to move around.      

  Fishing as you sit up higher in the seat is a major advantage while spotting fish and looking for structure in the water. When alone, I can actually stand up in the canoe to sight fish by bracing my calf against the yoke. This isn?t something I try when my wife is with me, but this is not at all possible in a kayak. Fishing from a tandem canoe when you are by yourself is not easy at first, but with some practice and maybe a little getting wet, you will discover the extra stability and room that fishing solo from the center will give you. I recommend the use of a double-bladed canoe paddle while paddling a tandem canoe solo. This seems to make the canoe much faster and easier to paddle when alone.       

 As I have mentioned, I am not knocking kayaks, they have some advantages over canoes such as you ride lower in the water giving the kayak much less wind resistance. This spring the strong wind has made our canoe a chore to use, but by the use of two mush anchors we have learned to position the canoe in the wind. 

 Other advantages of a canoe over a kayak are that a canoe can be paddled solo, tandem or with passengers. In a canoe you have easy access to, and more room for gear. And as I get older I like the fact that canoes offer a variety of sitting and kneeling positions rather than one sitting position. I have also found that canoes are much easier to get in and out of.    

Happy Fishing!
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