Study Shows Salmon Populations Endangered

#Atlantic SalmonNOAA
The Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) is studying the report by the independent scientific body COSEWIC that provides assessments pertaining to the state of health of wild Atlantic salmon populations throughout eastern Canada.Five wild Atlantic salmon population segments have been assessed as endangered, one as threatened, four as of special concern, one as extinct , four as not at risk and one data deficient. For a listing of the assessments, including the meaning of the terms, go to: //asf.ca/docs/uploads/1-cosewic-assessments.pdfThere is also a listing of the geographical limits of each population, and some of the rivers included: //asf.ca/docs/uploads/2-cosewic-populations.pdfDownload a map of the population segments and their proposed designations: //asf.ca/docs/uploads/4-map-assessments.pdfFor two of the segments (Inner and Outer Bay of Fundy), which have been assessed as endangered, poor marine survival and the negative impacts of salmon aquaculture are stated as among current threats.The south Newfoundland population segment, including the Conne River, has been assessed as threatened. Among the stated threats are poor marine survival, illegal fishing in some rivers, and the presence of salmon aquaculture in a small section of this area.Canada?s process for listing a species or population at risk is an extended one that allows public, industrial, and political consultation. The Minister of Environment must publish a response statement within 90 days. Government has a further 9 months within which to take a decision re listing; it is within these 9 months that there is public consultation. Based on this, a decision on the listing of the various populations of wild Atlantic salmon would not be expected before 2012. To check out the process: //asf.ca/docs/uploads/3-sara-process.pdfASF, our Regional Councils, and affiliates will participate in the consultation process before the Environment Minister makes a final decision.Read COSEWIC's Reasonings behind putting forward the status changes for the wild Atlantic salmon population segmentsPresently there are 32 populations of wild Atlantic salmon in the inner Bay of Fundy that are listed as endangered. Click here for more information on these riversASF and our Regional Councils are disappointed with the federal government?s process and lack of action in regard to the endangered inner Bay of Fundy (IBoF) populations..Problems with decreasing numbers of inner Bay of Fundy salmon were identified 20 years ago. Populations in these 32 rivers declined from 40,000 in the 1980s to 200 by 2001.COSEWIC indicated that these populations were endangered in 2001, and they were listed under the Species at Risk Act in 2003. It took until December 2009 for Fisheries and Ocean Canada to issue a draft recovery plan to which the public was invited to provide input. The recovery plan was approved Fisheries and Oceans Canada Minister in May, 2010. DFO expects it to take another four years to develop and finalize action plans! This is unacceptable.ASF and our Regional Councils constantly recommend that DFO dedicate and provide the additional funding that is needed to carry out the recovery strategy for the inner Bay of Fundy populations, and confirm the importance of the Live Gene Bank Program to recovery by including it in the department?s annual A-based budget. We recommend that marine critical habitat work become a priority and that the required resources be directed at this work, particularly regarding post-smolts, in order to give recovery the greatest chance of success.These actions become even more appropriate and relevant as we face the prospect of more listings. Future listings must be followed by timely development and implementation of effective and sufficiently-funded recovery plans.
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